HOW TO BREAK INTO Windows Home Server? (Part-2)

Having said what we have said in the previous article, there are some things you have to do directly, that require you to go mano a mano with your server. For example:

Ø If you need to install a driver, you can’t do it through the Windows Home Server Console; you need to wrestle directly with the server. You may need a driver that doesn’t ship with Windows 2003, particularly if you stick a printer on your server, or add some weird new hardware.

Ø If you want to install (or sometimes even run) a program that wasn’t designed for Windows Home Server, a trip to the server is in order. While programs designed to run under WHS can be installed and run using the Console, other programs generally can’t be installed (or sometimes even run) through the Windows Home Server Console. To install (run) those programs, you need to get into the server.

Ø If your network’s router doesn’t play properly with others, you may need to assign a permanent address — a static IP address — to your server. The only way to do that involves breaking into the server and uttering the proper magic incantations.

Ø If you don’t have easy access to a Windows XP or Vista Business, Enterprise or Ultimate computer on your network, and you need to restore a previous version of a file in one of the server’s shared folders, you have to dig into the server.

If you’re still hell-bent on breaking into your server, you’re most likely to find success using a Windows feature known as the Remote Desktop Protocol. Newbies call it “Remote Desktop,” but you can sound cool and refer to it by its guru’s nickname, “RDP.”

Logging On to the Server with RDP

If you’re convinced that the only way to solve your problem involves breaking into the server, you’ll be pleasantly surprised to discover how easily you can do it.

Here’s how to log on to the Administrator account on your WHS server:

1. Go to any computer on your network.

2. Start RDP in the way that works for your operating system.

– If the computer is running Windows XP, click Start ➪ All Programs➪ Accessories➪ Communications➪ Remote Desktop Connection.

– If the computer is running Windows Vista, click Start ➪ All Programs ➪ Accessories ➪ Remote Desktop Connection.

The Remote Desktop Connection dialog box asks you which computer you wish to log on to.

3. Type the name of the server in the box marked Computer and click Connect.

Unless you changed it, your server is probably called SERVER.

Remote Desktop whines and whirs for a few seconds, and then shows you the logon screen. It’s important to realize that the logon screen you see involves logging on to Windows Server 2003, on your WHS server.

4. In the box marked User Name, type Administrator. In the box marked Password, type the server’s password. Then click OK.

That’s the same password you use to log on to the Windows Home Server Console. You chose it when you first set up Windows Home Server. When Windows Server 2003 is ready for your command, Windows Home Server butts in and shows you the caution screen.

Once you see that screen, you’re running Windows Server 2003.

Now be very careful. Don’t run with scissors!

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