NEWSLETTER: GMAIL NO LONGER PUSHING ADVERTS & MIT IS BUILDING DRONE CHAUFFEUR

QUOTE OF THE DAY

“It is each man’s quest to find out who he truly is, but the answer to that lies in the present, not in the past. As it is for all of us.” – Matthias (Total Recall 2012)

GOOGLE WILL STOP USING EMAIL CONTENT FOR AD TARGETING

THE STORY

Company will no longer use information from user’s emails for personalized advertisements.

WHAT WILL IT CHANGE?

Till now, it was Google’s regular business practice to scan user emails for ad targeting. While this was clearly invasive on the company’s part,  no one complained and things went on being the same. However, Google seems to have realized this as a violation of user privacy and has decided to put an end to this practice. In a recent blogpost, Google announced it will stop scanning user emails to maintain confidentiality in communications and to ‘closely align’ consumer and business products.

SO WHAT’S NEXT?

This could have a serious impact on digital marketing and advertising according to many experts. Nevertheless, this would also improve privacy and maintain a healthy relationship between users and Google. G Suite for business is already an example where emails aren’t scanned for ad targeting. Hence it only seems natural that the same service should also be provided to the regular gmail users. However, G Suit does scan emails for other purposes such as spam filtering and other security scans.

WHAT DOES THIS SUGGEST?

A lot of people might be mistaken into believing that this means an ad-free Google. Unfortunately, this clearly isn’t so as ad targeting will now be based on user’s actions and browsing activities. This is certainly far less invasive and will certainly help build user trust in Google. This change also shows how Google holds its customers in high regard unlike several others.


MIT WORKING ON DRONES THAT CAN DRIVE FLYING AUTONOMOUS CARS

THE STORY

Mit demonstrates drones that can drive cars. Will be used in developing self-driving flying cars.

FLYING AUTONOMOUS CARS, REALLY?

Despite the self-driving technology being in a highly experimental phase, researchers and companies are still trying their best to make this dream into reality. Self-driving or autonomous vehicles have become a bane for the automobile industry as none of the giants are able to produce a street-ready model so far. On the contrary, drone technology has picked up really well and is being used in various sectors such as delivery and surveillance etc. In the recent turn of events, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) demonstrated a new system to control self-driving cars that involves the use of flying drones. If this comes to pass, then the possibilities are endless as we could see self-driving flying cars that could avoid traffic jams whenever they want by getting airborne.

HOW DOES THIS TECHNOLOGY WORK?

Developed by MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), this specialized drone works on ‘path-planning’ algorithms along with motor powered wheels to make autonomous driving a reality. In simulations, this robot was capable of flying 90 minutes or drive for 252 minutes till its battery ran out. However, it must be noted that adding the drive components did have a significant effect on the drone’s battery.

WHAT ARE ITS FUTURE PROSPECTS?

A CSAIL engineer when asked about its future said, “While there are obviously still big challenges to scaling up to vehicles that could actually transport humans, we are inspired by the potential of a future in which flying cars could offer us fast, traffic-free transportation.” And as we’ve already seen the possibilities that Toyota could come up with the world’s first flying car in 2020, this technology surely doesn’t seem far-fetched.

Akshay Peter

Akshay Luke Peters is a writer and blogger for Systweak Software. He likes to write about off-beat topics and technological awareness. He is also part musician who likes to explore the future of technology in entertainment and popular media.

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